"They're coming to get you, Barbra." These words will forever echo in the minds of horror movie fans around the world.

These famous lines, which sparked an entire genre of horror, were written by none other than George A. Romero, legendary director, writer, editor, and creator of the modern day zombie monster. A native New Yorker, Romero came to Pittsburgh to attend Carnegie Mellon University. Sadly, he passed away from lung cancer July 16th at the ripe age of 77.

I love zombie movies. To me, they are the most terrifying monsters. Whether they're Romero's slow moving, dim-witted flesh eaters, or fast and tactical like in 28 Days Later, just the thought of an undead army whose only intention is to eat your brains sends shivers down my appetizing spine.

My fascination with the zombie world started at a young age. My brother showed me Night of the Living Dead when I was around ten years old. It scared me to death, but it opened me up to the world of horror, and for that, I am forever indebted to Romero. 

Night of the Living Dead was released in 1968 with a budget of $114,000. Since then it has grossed more than $30 million and has become a staple of any horror buff's collection. The movie was shot locally in Monroeville, PA, putting the little town on the map.

Romero may have not known how important this film would be, but he managed to do two things: create the modern zombie, and use the film as a platform to hold a mirror to American society. Romero was a master at social commentary. To have an African-American protagonist, and to have the protagonist be the hero, only to be shot dead by police officers at the end, in 1968, was groundbreaking. Romero had found his voice, his niche.

His 1978 installment of the Dead series, Dawn of the Dead, continued to mock American culture by having the zombies roam the Monroeville Mall.  Even as thoughtless zombies, they still manage to make it to the center of American consumerism. 1985 brought along Day of the Dead, which shows us how dependent we can be on our government, and how the people in charge don't always know the answers.

Since 1968, zombies have evolved.  They've gotten smarter and they've gotten faster. 28 Days Later, aka cinematic gold, changed what a zombie movie could be. You won't be able to outrun these super-human-like zombies. Today's zombie is a hunter, seeking out prey rather than stumbling around until you trip and fall.

Zombies are no longer the cult they used to be, with television shows like The Walking Dead, and iZombie, video games like Left 4 Dead, and Dead Island, zombies have exploded into mainstream culture. Even literature has tackled  the subject of the undead, Max Brooks's The Zombie Survival Guide and World War Z are two best sellers, with the latter being made into a movie starring Brad freakin Pitt.

Without George A. Romero, there would be no modern zombie. Had he not pushed the envelope, this multi-million dollar scene would not be here. Romero was an innovator, a commentator, and an icon. With his passing, he leaves behind a legacy that has touched every horror fan on this earth. He will be missed, but if the zombie apocalypse does happen, it would be an honor to have him eat my brains.

So, what do you think?