30 Dec
2011

The Time Traveler’s Wife by Audrey Niffenegger

*Customer Pick: Lauren*

The Time Traveler's Wife is the best love story I have ever read.  It is also the only book  I have ever reread in it's entirety immediately upon finishing it. While I reread books all the time, of course, this is the only one I have ever needed to devour again as quickly as possible. The love story is neither hokey nor sappy at all and the characters got so deeply under my skin that I couldn't shake them for months. I wanted to know them, or I guess, to be them. I will not reveal much about the plot here because it'll sound impossibly gimmicky, I will assure you instead, that the author handles her premise with so much astonishing intelligence that you will go back and forth many times to try to string it all together. In fact, you may want to buy 2 copies: 1 to read and 1 to cut and paste in linear chronological order. Or, for now, just buy one. I envy anyone who has not read this book and still has it to look forward to.

30 Dec
2011

Scruples by Judith Krantz

*Kristen's Pick*

This was the first adult (and then some) book I read.  Adult themes, adult language ,and very adult situations.  Larger then life (well my life, anyway) fascinating characters, and a riveting dual storyline that will suck you in from page 1, Scruples is the consummate trashy beach read.  (Even if your beach is at Sandcastle).

30 Dec
2011

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

*Mya's Pick*

Sixteen people are invited to the reading of eccentric millionaire Samuel W. Westing’s will.  Depending on how they play the dangerous and tricky game he’s cooked up, they could become millionaires. A classic from my middle-school days - this is one of those books that I forced on my friends if I had learned that they somehow made it to high school without having read it. Full of cleverly laid clues and a wonderfully inventive ending, The Westing Game is pure fun.  A hint for the reader: pay CLOSE attention to any clue you are given.  They are your only hope in solving the mystery.

30 Dec
2011

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh by Michael Chabon

*Andy's Pick*

I am straddling the divide between the comfortable insulation of college and the weighty responsibilities of adulthood like Art the narrator in The Mysteries of Pittsburgh. The story follows the narrator, Art, as he travels around the city trying to uncover pieces of his burgeoning adult identity. Art’s sexuality, in particular, has garnered a disproportionate amount of critical attention, but the narrator’s dynamic with his mobster father, superficial friendships, and relationship with the city itself are all pieces in the puzzle that is Art‘s life. After all, I never thought aimlessly cruising through Shadyside, Oakland, and Squirrel Hill could make for such an engaging novel until I moved to Pittsburgh and saw the mysteries of the city for myself.

30 Dec
2011

The Monsters of Templeton by Lauren Groff

Excerpts from EW's interview with Stephen King:

"I'm having a day of mixed feelings: happy because I'm reading the manuscript of a novel that's full of magic, mystery, and monsters; sad because it will be finished tomorrow and on my shelf, with all it's secrets told and it's surviving characters set free to live their own lives (if characters have lives beyond the end of a novel -- I've always felt they do). The sense of sadness I feel at the approaching end of The Monsters of Templeton isn't just because the story's going to be over; when you read a good one -- and this is a very good one -- those feelings are deepened by the realization that you probably won't tie into anything that much fun again for a long time."

30 Dec
2011

The Princess Bride by William Goldman

*Kristen's Pick*

I know you have seen the movie, and loved it, (who didn’t love it?) but I can’t stress enough that you should also read this book. Read it for the hilarious ‘asides’ where Goldman takes you on an up close and personal tour of both his child and adulthood. Read it for the introduction, a beautiful and touching piece of writing (and includes juicy tidbits about making the movie). Read it for the “Buttercups Baby” explanation. Especially the conversation Goldman has with Stephen King (they are friends and have a sort of mutual admiration society going, a fact that never fails to delight me). The first line of the original text reads “This is my favorite book in all the world” and I couldn’t agree more.

30 Dec
2011

The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams

*Jessi's Pick*

Fans of the wacky, zany, and downright irreverent will love Adams' Hitchhiker’s Guide. The book centers around Arthur Dent, a man whose serene little world is destroyed (literally) and he finds himself to be almost the last man in the Universe… and all within the first 30 pages! I learned many valuable lessons from this book, like the importance of always carrying a towel, why you should never ask a Vogon to read you poetry, and that the answer to the ultimate question of life, the Universe and everything is 42. The 25th ed. Also includes photos, artwork and recollections of Adams’ friends. If you like this one, definitely follow up with The Ultimate Guide… Got your towel!?

30 Dec
2011

Post Secret by Frank Warren

*Blair's Pick*

This book slapped me across the face, punched me in the stomach, gave me ice cream and then tickled me. The most potent emotion this book evoked , however, was relief. This collection of postcards riddled with anonymous secrets lets you know that you are not alone in the world; these confessions wrap their creepy arms around you and say, “you’re one of us.” Both heartbreaking and funny, this is a must read.