2 Aug
2017

Happy Birthday, Kevin Smith!

I think I was about 12 or 13-years-old when my mom told me my cousin, Joe, was coming to stay the night. “He’ll be staying in your room, if that’s okay.” I was more than okay with it. I loved my cousin, Joe. He’s about 3 or 4 years older than me and I really wanted to impress him. It was pretty clear what I had to do.

He came over and I popped in my VHS copy of Clerks. It was perfect. The crude humor and awesome dialogue of Kevin Smith’s premiere film entertained Joe for the first time, and me for the 50th. I like to think that it made the awkward situation much easier on both of us.

I’ve been a fan of Kevin Smith ever since my brother showed me Mallrats and Clerks when I was 12 years old.   Smith had a Tarantino sense of dialogue and my sense of humor (filthy).  But it wasn't until he made Chasing Amy that I started to really appreciate him as a filmmaker.

Kevin Smith was born on August 2, 1970, in Red Bank, New Jersey.  While attending high school (as a B and C student), he would film his school's basketball games and create sketches in the vein of Saturday Night Live.

On his 21st birthday, he saw Richard Linklater's first film, Slacker.  The movie, which lacked any clear plot and focused instead on dialogue and the quirky characters of Austin, Texas, inspired Smith to be a serious filmmaker.  "It was the movie that got me off my ass; it was the movie that lit a fire under me, the movie that made me think, 'Hey, I could be a filmmaker.'"

After attending Vancouver Film School for four months, Smith left halfway through the semester so that he could save money to shoot his first film, Clerks.

The film follows a day in the life of Dante Hicks, a convenience store worker, and his slacker friend, Randall, who works at the video store next to him, though he is rarely seen working.  The film explores such subjects as infidelity, necrophilia, hockey, pop culture, and complacency in the workplace (as well as in life).  Smith shot Clerks at the convenience store he was working at in Leonardo, NJ.  He would work at the store during the day, and then shoot at night, which afforded him about an hour of sleep each night.  Because most of the movie is set during the day, he shot in black and white and kept the shutters for the store window closed so the lighting wouldn't be as prominent.

Clerks was a financial success.  With a budget of about $27,000 (mostly from maxed-out credit cards), the film grossed over $3 million despite a limited theatrical release.  The success of Clerks launched Smith's career as a filmmaker.  He went on to write, direct, and co-produce Mallrats, Chasing Amy, Dogma, Jay and Silent Bob Strike Back, Zack and Miri Make a Porno, Clerks II, and many more.

It's hard to talk about Kevin Smith and his career without bringing up a few key movies.  After Clerks, many in the film industry had great hopes for Smith, believing him to be a voice for generation X.  His next film Mallrats, though not as successful, kept the same tone and explored much of the same subject matter that Clerks had explored.

His next film, Chasing Amy, was described by Quentin Tarantino as a "Quantum Leap forward" for Smith.  The contents of Chasing Amy share some similarities with his previous efforts.  It was still raunchy and dialogue-heavy.  There were plenty of pop culture references. Even the cast was similar to Mallrats, both featuring Ben Affleck, Jason Lee, and Joey Lauren Adams. But Chasing Amy still stood apart from everything Smith had made.  It was mature, thoughtful, and more emotionally-developed than his previous work.  Even now, I can't think of a movie that better explores the themes of sexual identity and friendship, with a balance of delicacy and bluntness.  If you've never seen it, you should.  Like, now!  I'll wait.

In the meantime "What's a Nubian?"

There's something incredible about Smith as a filmmaker.  In the same way Slacker made him rethink what was possible in film-making,  Smith's films (especially his early work) helped me realize that the only difference between a casual movie watcher and a filmmaker is a camera and a typewriter (um, computer).  You don't need a great deal of money.  You don't need a plot.  You don't even really need an audience.  All you need is a camera and a vision.  You might not make money doing it, but it can be done.  If the movies that exist in your head are better than the movies that are currently out there, do yourself a favor, and make the movie in your head.

That's what Smith did with Clerks.  I revisited the movie a little later in my life and was surprised to find that it holds up pretty well. The dialogue, which I had thought was genius when I was younger, is a little juvenile. It also kind of insisted on itself, like Smith knew that what he was writing was clever. The drama of the film, however, is pretty solid, as is the camera placement and the editing.  But more than anything, it's a unique voice in the world of film.  Smith had never seen a movie that depicted the doldrums of day-to-day living in the working world.  Everything from the annoying customers to the cheating partners, to discussions about helpless independent contractors working on the Death Star, Clerks shows that the day-to-day lives of two store clerks can be just as dramatic and entertaining as anything else in theaters.

Happy Birthday, Kev!  I assure you, we're proud of you!
2 Aug
2017

Put it in my Mouth, or, the Joys of an Ice Cream Sandwich

There exists in nature (and on occasion the hand of man) some things that, when experienced, always seems to be the solution to a bad day.  A tasty, mouth-watering treat can often be one of those things. Good for all ages and all times of the year; I always recommend indulging in an ice cream sandwich whenever you can get your hands on one.

On a hot day is generally best, when the sweat is dripping from your brow and you're incredibly thirsty, an ice cream sandwich is the perfect thing to cool you down. Then again, on a cold winter evening, an ice cream sandwich is the perfect thing to curl up with under the blanket while watching a good movie.

The best thing is that they come in all shapes, sizes, colors, and tastes. Some even come with extras, such as Jimmies or dip. I suggest trying different types, rather than settling on just one. There's a full menu out there. Why not try it out until you find a favorite?

As long as one remembers the simple rules of eating an ice cream sandwich: Never indulge too frequently (moderation is key to enjoyment); wash yourself off afterwards (messiness can be a sign of enjoyment during, but afterwards, no one wants to be sticky and covered in goo); take your time (enjoy all the sensations. There's no use in gobbling it down and forgetting the whole thing two minutes later); never pay for it when you can get it for free (it pays to have a winning personality when hoping for freebies); share (give as good as you get).

Hopefully, you've gained something from reading this and will run out for an ice cream sandwich of your very own. Perhaps the ice cream man will bring one to your door! Buon appetito!

1 Aug
2017

August 2017 Holidays and Birthdays

Happy August! Welcome to the eighth wonder of the, erm, year. Just kidding. This month we have a ton of stuff to be JAZZED about! There's National Ice Cream Sandwich Day, Book Lover's DayBad Poetry Day, and National Waffle Day just to name a few. Read on to see everything we're celebrating this month. Read more >>

18 Jul
2017

Go Gonzo: It’s Hunter S. Thompson’s Birthday

July 18 is Hunter S. Thompson's birthday.  It seemed like it would be easy to write about Thompson when I first volunteered for this blog entry.  His writing is so abrasive and so human that it's hard to ignore, easy to consume, and, ultimately, difficult to digest.  Understanding the "why" of Hunter S. Thompson is much harder than simply observing the spectacle he created.  Many of us know what he did.  Several documentaries, op ed pieces, biographies written by friends, and a certain movie have rendered Thompson into a consumable public figure.

Hunter S. Thompson was born July 18th, 1937, in Louisville, Kentucky.  He was the first of three sons of Jack Robert Thompson, a public insurance adjuster, and Virginia Ray Davison, head librarian at the Louisville Public Library.  He was 14 years old when his father died of a neuromuscular disease known as myasthenia gravis.  After his father's death, Thompson and his two brothers, Davison Wheeler and James Garnet, were raised by their mother, who began drinking heavily.  While attending Louisville Male High School, he was accepted as a member of the Athenaeum Literary Association.  While a member, he contributed articles to the club's yearbook, The Spectator.  However, he was ejected from the club in 1955 after being charged with being an accessory to robbery (he was in the car with the perpetrator).  He was sentenced to 60 days in Jefferson County Jail and served thirty-one.  As a result, he was not allowed to take final exams and did not graduate high school.

Thompson first came to prominence with his book, Hell's Angels (1966).  He had spent a year observing and living with the infamous motorcycle gang.  His writing was completely different than anything else written about the Hell's Angels, deciding to humanize the gang and give insight into their rituals and philosophy rather than simply reporting on their exploits.  He paid a price for embedding himself in the group.  He was assaulted by a member of the gang after expressing his dissatisfaction with the gang member's treatment of a woman at the scene.  Pictures of his bruised face accompany the book towards the end.

Hunter's face after an altercation with a Hell's Angel

When Thompson wrote "The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved," he changed journalism.  After being asked to cover the Kentucky Derby by Scanlan's Monthly, Thompson and his friend, illustrator and collaborator Ralph Steadman, attended the event but could not cover it since they couldn't see the race from their seats.  Having to adhere to a deadline, Thompson tore pages out of his notebook, numbered them, and sent them in to the publisher.  Instead of talking about the race, he decided to focus on the behavior of the crowd and the general atmosphere of the venue.  A sports article turned social commentary, "The Kentucky Derby is Decadent and Depraved" was where the term "Gonzo journalism" was coined. In response to the article, Bill Cardoso, editor of the Boston Globe, wrote to Thompson saying, "This is it, this is pure Gonzo. If this is a start, keep rolling." Gonzo is slang for bizarre or crazy.

Ralph Steadman's illustration of the Kentucky Derby, 1970

 

From that point on, Hunter S. Thompson spearheaded the Gonzo journalism movement.  Writing from a subjective perspective, involving himself in the story to a large degree, and mixing together elements of fiction and non-fiction, he wrote many great sports articles, political pieces and books, including Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, Fear And Loathing on the Campaign Trail '72, and The Rum Diary.

After a few decades of erratic behavior and a less-than-stellar output of material, Thompson committed suicide in his Woody Creek, Colorado, home.  He was 67 years old.

Plenty of terms can be used to describe Hunter S. Thompson:  Drug addict, gun-nut, psychotic, genius.  I know that my first impression of him came from the Terry Gilliam adaptation of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas.  Johnny Depp's portrayal of Thompson was endlessly entertaining and brilliant, but I didn't realize until after seeing documentary footage just how accurate Depp's performance was.  Thompson was a human cartoon, and matching up his personality on camera to his writing gives tremendous insight into his writing style.  He was a man who believed that the truth was dead in front of you, even if all the facts weren't.

Happy birthday, Hunter.  Here's hoping there's endless football in heaven.

9 Jul
2017

July 10th is National Piña Colada Day!

Mmmmmmmmm, piñassssssssss.

The pineappleyest, coconuttiest, deliciousest day of the year!

I went to Key West for the first time this past January, and let me tell you, it was amazing.  There were lots of things about it that I loved, but one of the biggest was all the piña coladas I drank.  And they were a legion.  So much rum, you guys.  So much.  I loved them so much that I came home from my wedding trip to Key West and almost immediately bought an awesome Ninja blender so I could make them myself at home.  One of the best purchases I have made.

I need to go to there.

The piña colada was invented in Puerto Rico at the Caribe Hilton Hotel's Beachcomber Bar in San Juan in 1954.  It has been giving us all glorious, tropical, rum-filled brain freeze ever since.  In 1978 it was named the national drink of Puerto Rico.  All of which basically makes me want to move there.

Now.  Many people, who like to think of themselves as aficionados of alcohol consumption, tend to find the piña colada overly sweet.  These people are, if you'll pardon the expression, nincompoops.  First of all, pineapple juice is literally the King of Fruit Juices.  It is patently delectable.  If I could live on pineapple juice alone, I might.  Perhaps only augmenting my diet with cream of coconut, ice, and rum.  Maybe a maraschino cherry every now and then. If you know what I mean.

Secondly, cream of coconut is amazing.  Speaking as someone who is not particularly fond of coconut, cream of coconut is really one of the most delightful substances in the world.  It has all the wonderful, tropical goodness of coconut without the weird textural nightmare that is shredded coconut.

Finally, there's the rum.  Ah, rum.  You may like your margaritas.  You may like your cosmopolitans.  But tequila and vodka are to rum as your high school tennis coach is to Serena Williams.  Rum is one of the best spirits out there.  It's versatile, being delicious on its own and mixed into drinks.  It can have all the beautiful flavor complexity of good whisky and usually has very little of the accompanying bite.  It's liquor for people smart enough to realize that you don't have to pretend to like something that tastes like dirt (looking your way, tequila) in order to be cool.  Plus, it's the drink of pirates.  And, be honest with yourself, you want to be a pirate.

Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaas.

 

Basically, what I'm saying is that this July 10th, go out and get yourself a piña colada.  Or, better yet, make yourself some at home.  If you have a blender, you're pretty much all set.  Buy some good rum, some pineapple juice, cream of coconut, make sure your ice trays are full, and go to town!  My preferred recipe is equal parts white rum and pineapple juice, about half again as much cream of coconut, ice to fill my blender, and blend until smooth! Don't be afraid to let your blender go for a while.  Mine has a "frozen drink" setting (not to brag), and it definitely takes a minute or two.  It blends it up good.  Pour into a tall glass, finish with a dark rum floater and a couple maraschinos (if you want them).  Enjoy!

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3 Jul
2017

Exploring Kafka’s World

In his new book, But What If We're Wrong?, Chuck Klosterman explores the possibility that the greatest writer of our generation is yet unknown. In other words, it's quite possible that 20 years from now, the person who will be considered the greatest writer of their generation would be someone who isn't famous or even published, but in time becomes extremely well-known. Klosterman cites two examples of this actually happening: Herman Melville and Franz Kafka.

Although Melville published several novels, travel accounts, and volumes of poetry, he was not a popular author during his lifetime. The epic novel Moby Dick came to be recognized as a culturally important classic only after World War II.

On the other hand, Kafka, who was born on July 3, 1883, never published his own work. He never wanted to be recognized. He never wanted to be famous or culturally relevant. Indeed, he asked a friend to incinerate most of his writings after he died. Fortunately for us, the friend (and later biographer, Max Brod) abstained, instead publishing Kafka’s letters, short stories, and unfinished novels.

Next time you read The Metamorphosis, think of this guy

Perhaps Kafka wanted his life’s work burnt because he was ashamed of it. This would be fitting, since feelings of shame and guilt permeate his writing, passing on to us the traumas he suffered throughout his life. Kafka was raised by a domineering father who instilled shame and guilt into Franz from a young age. He described his father as "a true Kafka in strength, health, appetite, loudness of voice, eloquence, self-satisfaction, worldly dominance, endurance, presence of mind, [and] knowledge of human nature."

It's unfortunate that I even have to mention his father in this post. I in no way want to imply that a father's abuse crafted one of America's most influential authors. Yet, reading Kafka’s writing, there is an inescapable sense that perhaps it did.

Hermann Kafka, Franz's father

Kafka’s father deprived him of confidence, love, and for all intents and purposes, a home. The shame Franz felt nearly deprived us of some of his greatest work. His body of work was limited to a collection of short stories, the novella, The Metamorphosis, and three novels which he did not complete: The Trial, The Castle, and Amerika, originally titled The Missing Man.

The suffering Kafka endured as a child and a young man lent his writing a richly unsettling air of paranoia, guilt, alienation, and horror. Most interestingly, his work, surviving its intended cremation, lives on by request of the public at large (most, if not all of his works, are still in print), as well as in the mind of any one reader, as the force and potency of his writing leaves an indelible, and eerily personal, mark.

So here's to Franz Kafka, a man who believed that literature should be a tool for examining the ugly parts of ourselves that, though horrifying, need examined.  Or to quote the man himself:

"A book must be the ax for the frozen sea within us."

And now to end this post on a much-needed positive note, the show Home Movies' rock opera about Kafka (and Louis Pasteur at the end for some reason).

 

 

1 Jul
2017

Book Bingo 2017

IT'S TIME FOR BINGO!

Well, you've all been asking when Bingo starts, and IT'S TODAY! (July 1st!)  This year, we have A THEME! That's right! It's all about learning new things and reading books that are new and different than other books you might have read before. Are you pumped to get started??? WE SUPER ARE SO EXCITED ABOUT THIS!!!!!
Keep reading on for the full explanation of the game. We're stoked you're joining us for 2017 Book BINGO!!

Crossing off squares!

Read a book that counts for the square you'd like to complete. (or, do the action it requires)
When you are finished with a book, post a picture of your book (or open kindle) on Facebook or Instagram or Twitter and tag us! Make sure you tell us which square you're crossing off. Only one square per book, please!
One book per day! We know maybe you read faster than that so if you finish two books in one day, save one of the posts for the next day! And make sure you don't wait until last minute to post all your books. We are curious peeps and want to know what you're reading! :)
Each time you cross off a square you will get one raffle entry towards winning a $100 Gift Card to Kards! So, the more you cross off, the better chance you have of winning!

BINGO!

When you get Bingo, (5 squares vertical, horizontal or diagonal) you'll win a 10% off coupon for one item of your choice! Make sure you're keeping track at home. Just like in real bingo, you have to tell us you have a bingo in order to win. We'll be keeping track of your squares and will double check when you say 'BINGO!' on your Facebook or Instagram. (make sure you tag us, though. Don't be shouting into the internet randomly! We might miss it.)

The Rules:

-One square per book! Yes, we know that some books are on our summer pick list AND are Pulitzer Prize winners. but you have to read TWO books to cross of both squares.
-One book per day! Speed readers, just save those books for another post on another day!
-You have to post on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, tag us, and include #KUBookBingo to get credit for your squares. Please take a picture of your book, post on Facebook or Instagram, tag Kards Unlimited, and make sure to say which square you're crossing off. Also, if you have a bingo, Say it LOUD! Here is an example: "(pretty picture of the book The Handmaid's Tale) Just finished reading The Handmaid's Tale for @Kards Unlimited book bingo! I've just crossed off the Banned Book square! #KUBookBingo"
-You have to post BINGO to get a bingo! While we'll be keeping track of your squares, you have to say it to win it! Just post on FB or Instagram that you've gotten a summer reading bingo and make sure to tag us! We'll get in touch with you to get you your coupon.

The Squares:

Show off your Coloring Skillz: Get yourself coloring book for grown-ups and do some ART! Post a picture of your creation to cross off the square.
Translation or Bilingual Author: Read something that was originally written in a different language, or by someone who speaks multiple languages.
RESIST WALL: Check out our display of Mind-Expanding Books and books about super rad resistors! Read any of those books to check off this square.
Dystopia or Utopia: This is pretty clear. There are so many books to choose that would count for this square. SO MANY.
Anisfield-Wolf Award: This award recognizes books that have made important contributions to our understanding of racism and our appreciation of the rich diversity of human cultures. Check out their website for a list of options!
Your Pick: Been wanting to read something that doesn't count for a square? Well, read it to cross of this one!
Minority Superhero: Read a story (fiction or nonfiction, graphic novel or written word) about a superhero who is a minority.
Alternate Spirituality: We're talking Zen, Yoga, Mindfulness, Happy Thoughts, anything that makes you sit back and think for a minute, or sit back and NOT think for a minute. Want to read a book about how to deep clean your apartment. Totes counts. Want to read Eat, Pray, Love? We'll count that too.
A Good ol' Bad Book: Re-read your favorite guilty pleasure, that one book that everyone loves to hate on, but you secretly love. OR read a book that has TERRIBLE reviews and then tell us what you thought!
Follow us on Facebook: This one’s really easy! Just hit the ‘follow’ button! If you already follow us, just tag us in a status or picture to get these squares crossed off.
Newbery Award: Read a book that has won a Newbery Award!
LGBTQ+ Romance: It doesn't have to be the main plot, but like, it should be.
FREE SPACE: Just cross it off already! You're one square away from a 10% coupon!
Cook from a cookbook: Try out a recipe from your new favorite cookbook and share a picture of your delish results!
Different Life Story: Read a book about someone growing up in a different place or time than you did!
Follow us on Twitter or Instagram: Same as the Facebook square, except it’s Twitter and Instagram!
Graphic Novel: Read a Graphic Novel. It's really that simple.
Outside Your Comfort Zone: Do you usually always read one type of book? For me, it's Fantasy and fiction. Read something completely different from your usual! Maybe instead of those historical romances, read a space opera! Or instead of that biography, read a book of poetry!
Minority Author: Woman, POC, LGBTQ+, there are so many authors out there that ....aren't white men. TRY IT OUT.
Our Pick: Tweet us or message us on FB, and we will choose you a book that we think you might LOVE!
Current Events: Fiction or Non-Fiction, read something about things that have happened ....let's say from 2000. That's current, right?
Ask the Library: Tweet at Carnegie Library to get a great book recommendation! Make sure to tag us and use #KUbookbingo! Like this: "Hey @carnegielibrary! @KardsUnlimted says you can hook me up with a reading suggestion! What should I read next?"
Pulitzer Prize: Read a book that's won a Pulitzer.
KU Staff Summer Picks: Check out our summer reading display and choose a book that speaks to you! ...Or maybe don't choose one that talks to you because talking books doesn't REALLY happen and you might need help.
Hugo Award: Read a book that's won the Hugo which is an award for best science fiction or fantasy for that particular year. Here's a link!

Good Luck! Read Hard!

For Book Suggestions, follow this link!