9 Jul
2017

July 10th is National Piña Colada Day!

Mmmmmmmmm, piñassssssssss.

The pineappleyest, coconuttiest, deliciousest day of the year!

I went to Key West for the first time this past January, and let me tell you, it was amazing.  There were lots of things about it that I loved, but one of the biggest was all the piña coladas I drank.  And they were a legion.  So much rum, you guys.  So much.  I loved them so much that I came home from my wedding trip to Key West and almost immediately bought an awesome Ninja blender so I could make them myself at home.  One of the best purchases I have made.

I need to go to there.

The piña colada was invented in Puerto Rico at the Caribe Hilton Hotel's Beachcomber Bar in San Juan in 1954.  It has been giving us all glorious, tropical, rum-filled brain freeze ever since.  In 1978 it was named the national drink of Puerto Rico.  All of which basically makes me want to move there.

Now.  Many people, who like to think of themselves as aficionados of alcohol consumption, tend to find the piña colada overly sweet.  These people are, if you'll pardon the expression, nincompoops.  First of all, pineapple juice is literally the King of Fruit Juices.  It is patently delectable.  If I could live on pineapple juice alone, I might.  Perhaps only augmenting my diet with cream of coconut, ice, and rum.  Maybe a maraschino cherry every now and then. If you know what I mean.

Secondly, cream of coconut is amazing.  Speaking as someone who is not particularly fond of coconut, cream of coconut is really one of the most delightful substances in the world.  It has all the wonderful, tropical goodness of coconut without the weird textural nightmare that is shredded coconut.

Finally, there's the rum.  Ah, rum.  You may like your margaritas.  You may like your cosmopolitans.  But tequila and vodka are to rum as your high school tennis coach is to Serena Williams.  Rum is one of the best spirits out there.  It's versatile, being delicious on its own and mixed into drinks.  It can have all the beautiful flavor complexity of good whisky and usually has very little of the accompanying bite.  It's liquor for people smart enough to realize that you don't have to pretend to like something that tastes like dirt (looking your way, tequila) in order to be cool.  Plus, it's the drink of pirates.  And, be honest with yourself, you want to be a pirate.

Yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaas.

 

Basically, what I'm saying is that this July 10th, go out and get yourself a piña colada.  Or, better yet, make yourself some at home.  If you have a blender, you're pretty much all set.  Buy some good rum, some pineapple juice, cream of coconut, make sure your ice trays are full, and go to town!  My preferred recipe is equal parts white rum and pineapple juice, about half again as much cream of coconut, ice to fill my blender, and blend until smooth! Don't be afraid to let your blender go for a while.  Mine has a "frozen drink" setting (not to brag), and it definitely takes a minute or two.  It blends it up good.  Pour into a tall glass, finish with a dark rum floater and a couple maraschinos (if you want them).  Enjoy!

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3 Jul
2017

Exploring Kafka’s World

In his new book, But What If We're Wrong?, Chuck Klosterman explores the possibility that the greatest writer of our generation is yet unknown. In other words, it's quite possible that 20 years from now, the person who will be considered the greatest writer of their generation would be someone who isn't famous or even published, but in time becomes extremely well-known. Klosterman cites two examples of this actually happening: Herman Melville and Franz Kafka.

Although Melville published several novels, travel accounts, and volumes of poetry, he was not a popular author during his lifetime. The epic novel Moby Dick came to be recognized as a culturally important classic only after World War II.

On the other hand, Kafka, who was born on July 3, 1883, never published his own work. He never wanted to be recognized. He never wanted to be famous or culturally relevant. Indeed, he asked a friend to incinerate most of his writings after he died. Fortunately for us, the friend (and later biographer, Max Brod) abstained, instead publishing Kafka’s letters, short stories, and unfinished novels.

Next time you read The Metamorphosis, think of this guy

Perhaps Kafka wanted his life’s work burnt because he was ashamed of it. This would be fitting, since feelings of shame and guilt permeate his writing, passing on to us the traumas he suffered throughout his life. Kafka was raised by a domineering father who instilled shame and guilt into Franz from a young age. He described his father as "a true Kafka in strength, health, appetite, loudness of voice, eloquence, self-satisfaction, worldly dominance, endurance, presence of mind, [and] knowledge of human nature."

It's unfortunate that I even have to mention his father in this post. I in no way want to imply that a father's abuse crafted one of America's most influential authors. Yet, reading Kafka’s writing, there is an inescapable sense that perhaps it did.

Hermann Kafka, Franz's father

Kafka’s father deprived him of confidence, love, and for all intents and purposes, a home. The shame Franz felt nearly deprived us of some of his greatest work. His body of work was limited to a collection of short stories, the novella, The Metamorphosis, and three novels which he did not complete: The Trial, The Castle, and Amerika, originally titled The Missing Man.

The suffering Kafka endured as a child and a young man lent his writing a richly unsettling air of paranoia, guilt, alienation, and horror. Most interestingly, his work, surviving its intended cremation, lives on by request of the public at large (most, if not all of his works, are still in print), as well as in the mind of any one reader, as the force and potency of his writing leaves an indelible, and eerily personal, mark.

So here's to Franz Kafka, a man who believed that literature should be a tool for examining the ugly parts of ourselves that, though horrifying, need examined.  Or to quote the man himself:

"A book must be the ax for the frozen sea within us."

And now to end this post on a much-needed positive note, the show Home Movies' rock opera about Kafka (and Louis Pasteur at the end for some reason).

 

 

1 Jul
2017

Book Bingo 2017

IT'S TIME FOR BINGO!

Well, you've all been asking when Bingo starts, and IT'S TODAY! (July 1st!)  This year, we have A THEME! That's right! It's all about learning new things and reading books that are new and different than other books you might have read before. Are you pumped to get started??? WE SUPER ARE SO EXCITED ABOUT THIS!!!!!
Keep reading on for the full explanation of the game. We're stoked you're joining us for 2017 Book BINGO!!

Crossing off squares!

Read a book that counts for the square you'd like to complete. (or, do the action it requires)
When you are finished with a book, post a picture of your book (or open kindle) on Facebook or Instagram or Twitter and tag us! Make sure you tell us which square you're crossing off. Only one square per book, please!
One book per day! We know maybe you read faster than that so if you finish two books in one day, save one of the posts for the next day! And make sure you don't wait until last minute to post all your books. We are curious peeps and want to know what you're reading! :)
Each time you cross off a square you will get one raffle entry towards winning a $100 Gift Card to Kards! So, the more you cross off, the better chance you have of winning!

BINGO!

When you get Bingo, (5 squares vertical, horizontal or diagonal) you'll win a 10% off coupon for one item of your choice! Make sure you're keeping track at home. Just like in real bingo, you have to tell us you have a bingo in order to win. We'll be keeping track of your squares and will double check when you say 'BINGO!' on your Facebook or Instagram. (make sure you tag us, though. Don't be shouting into the internet randomly! We might miss it.)

The Rules:

-One square per book! Yes, we know that some books are on our summer pick list AND are Pulitzer Prize winners. but you have to read TWO books to cross of both squares.
-One book per day! Speed readers, just save those books for another post on another day!
-You have to post on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram, tag us, and include #KUBookBingo to get credit for your squares. Please take a picture of your book, post on Facebook or Instagram, tag Kards Unlimited, and make sure to say which square you're crossing off. Also, if you have a bingo, Say it LOUD! Here is an example: "(pretty picture of the book The Handmaid's Tale) Just finished reading The Handmaid's Tale for @Kards Unlimited book bingo! I've just crossed off the Banned Book square! #KUBookBingo"
-You have to post BINGO to get a bingo! While we'll be keeping track of your squares, you have to say it to win it! Just post on FB or Instagram that you've gotten a summer reading bingo and make sure to tag us! We'll get in touch with you to get you your coupon.

The Squares:

Show off your Coloring Skillz: Get yourself coloring book for grown-ups and do some ART! Post a picture of your creation to cross off the square.
Translation or Bilingual Author: Read something that was originally written in a different language, or by someone who speaks multiple languages.
RESIST WALL: Check out our display of Mind-Expanding Books and books about super rad resistors! Read any of those books to check off this square.
Dystopia or Utopia: This is pretty clear. There are so many books to choose that would count for this square. SO MANY.
Anisfield-Wolf Award: This award recognizes books that have made important contributions to our understanding of racism and our appreciation of the rich diversity of human cultures. Check out their website for a list of options!
Your Pick: Been wanting to read something that doesn't count for a square? Well, read it to cross of this one!
Minority Superhero: Read a story (fiction or nonfiction, graphic novel or written word) about a superhero who is a minority.
Alternate Spirituality: We're talking Zen, Yoga, Mindfulness, Happy Thoughts, anything that makes you sit back and think for a minute, or sit back and NOT think for a minute. Want to read a book about how to deep clean your apartment. Totes counts. Want to read Eat, Pray, Love? We'll count that too.
A Good ol' Bad Book: Re-read your favorite guilty pleasure, that one book that everyone loves to hate on, but you secretly love. OR read a book that has TERRIBLE reviews and then tell us what you thought!
Follow us on Facebook: This one’s really easy! Just hit the ‘follow’ button! If you already follow us, just tag us in a status or picture to get these squares crossed off.
Newbery Award: Read a book that has won a Newbery Award!
LGBTQ+ Romance: It doesn't have to be the main plot, but like, it should be.
FREE SPACE: Just cross it off already! You're one square away from a 10% coupon!
Cook from a cookbook: Try out a recipe from your new favorite cookbook and share a picture of your delish results!
Different Life Story: Read a book about someone growing up in a different place or time than you did!
Follow us on Twitter or Instagram: Same as the Facebook square, except it’s Twitter and Instagram!
Graphic Novel: Read a Graphic Novel. It's really that simple.
Outside Your Comfort Zone: Do you usually always read one type of book? For me, it's Fantasy and fiction. Read something completely different from your usual! Maybe instead of those historical romances, read a space opera! Or instead of that biography, read a book of poetry!
Minority Author: Woman, POC, LGBTQ+, there are so many authors out there that ....aren't white men. TRY IT OUT.
Our Pick: Tweet us or message us on FB, and we will choose you a book that we think you might LOVE!
Current Events: Fiction or Non-Fiction, read something about things that have happened ....let's say from 2000. That's current, right?
Ask the Library: Tweet at Carnegie Library to get a great book recommendation! Make sure to tag us and use #KUbookbingo! Like this: "Hey @carnegielibrary! @KardsUnlimted says you can hook me up with a reading suggestion! What should I read next?"
Pulitzer Prize: Read a book that's won a Pulitzer.
KU Staff Summer Picks: Check out our summer reading display and choose a book that speaks to you! ...Or maybe don't choose one that talks to you because talking books doesn't REALLY happen and you might need help.
Hugo Award: Read a book that's won the Hugo which is an award for best science fiction or fantasy for that particular year. Here's a link!

Good Luck! Read Hard!

For Book Suggestions, follow this link! 

 

1 Jul
2017

Bingo 20017 Book Suggestions


If you don't have a stash of coloring books at home, we have SO Many! Here are just some of the ones we have in stock. 
Pro tip: If you're the type of person who doesn't want to color in the book over those pretty pages, photocopy a page! Then you can color it over and over again until you GET IT PERFECT.

- American Gods Coloring Book
- Narnia Coloring Book
- Swearword Coloring Book
- Star Trek Coloring Book
- The Enchanted Sea Coloring Book
- The Pittsburgh Coloring Book
- The National Parks Coloring Book
- Color Me Jane
- The Serenity Coloring Book (as in, Firefly!)
- Buffy the Vampire Slayer Coloring Book

 

We're not asking you to, like, go and learn another language here. (Although everyone should maybe at least try?) There are plenty of options to check off this box, but here are a few ideas!

- The Litte Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry
- Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
- The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin
- Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami
- Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett
- The Master and Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
- Night by Elie Wiesel
- The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson 
- Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
- The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho

Visit us in the store to see our full "Read without Borders" collection! Just ask at the counter and we'll show you the way. For those of you that can't make it in, here are a few choice selections.

- The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood
- Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi
- The Girl Who Drank the Moon by Kelly Barnhill
- I Am Not Your Negro by James Baldwin and Raoul Peck
- The Fire This Time by Jesmyn Ward
- The Man in the High Castle by Philip K. Dick
- When We Rise: My Life in the Movement by Cleve Jones
- An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States by Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
- Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
- V for Vendetta by Alan Moore

 

Dystopia is, like, so fetch right now. There are some pretty great classics that fit in this box, but plenty of new things as well!

- Utopia by Thomas More
- The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins 
- Divergent by Veronica Roth 
- 1984 by George Orwell 
- Brave New World by Aldous Huxley 
- The Giver by Lois Lowry 
- The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau 
- The Circle by Dave Eggers
- Lord of the Flies by William Golding 
- The Fifth Season by N. K. Jemisin

Here are some of the books that we know and love! For the rest of the award winners, visit their website!

- The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
- On Beauty by Zadie Smith
- Beloved by Toni Morrison
- Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly
- A Brief History of Seven Killings by Marlon James
- The Warmth of Other Suns by Isabel Wilkerson
- Invisible Man Paperback by Ralph Ellison 
- The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle by Lillian Faderman
- Far From the Tree by Andrew Solomon

It doesn't have to be a comic or a graphic novel, and we're pretty stretchy on the definition of Superhero....

- Moon Girl and Devil Dinosaur by Brandon Montclare and  Amy Reeder 
- Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson and Sara Pichelli -                                                                                             --    -Black Panther by Ta Nehisi Coates
- The Secret History of Wonder Woman by Jill Lepore
- The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot
- Huck by Mark Millar

 

We're going to be pretty darn flexible about this square. Gardening books, yoga books, organization books, they all count! Step out of your comfort zone and read something that will enrich your mind AND spirit.

- The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo
- Zen and Tonic by Jules Aron
- Cosmos by Carl Sagan
- The Book of English Magic by Philip Carr-Gomm and Richard Heygate
- Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance by Robert M. Pirsig
- The Power of Myth by Joseph Campbell
- The Spell of the Sensuous by David Abram
- Eat, Pray, Love by Elizabeth Gilbert
- The Tao of Travel by Paul Theroux
- Johnathan Livingston Seagull by Richard Bach

You know the ones. They're the books that you're kind of embarrassed about reading, but also really can't stop yourself. We swear we won't judge. Most of us have probably read all of these books already.

- 50 Shades of Grey by E. L. James
- Twilight by Stephanie Meyer
- One for the Money by Janet Evanovich
- The Tommyknockers by Stephen King                                                                                                                           -The Host by Stephanie Meyer

Don't discount these books just because they're for a younger audience! There are some really amazing books in here, and they're probably a quick read too! Which means more time for more Bingos!

- A Wrinkle in Time by Madeleine L'Engle
- The Graveyard Book by Neil Gaiman
- The Tale of Despereaux by Kate DiCamillo
- Holes by Lois Sachar
- The Hero and the Crown by Robin McKinley
- The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin
- The High King by Lloyd Alexander
- The Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil by E. L. Konigsburg
- Mrs. Frisby and the Rats of NIMH by Robert C. O'Brien
- Bridge to Terabithia by Katherine Paterson

It doesn't have to be a ROMANCE book. It can be any book that talks about LGBTQ+ love!

- Far From You by Tess Sharpe
- Y; The Last Man by Brian K. Vaughan
- Luna by Julie Anne Peters
- Every Day by David Levithan
- Will Grayson, Will Grayson by John Green and David Levithan
- The Fifth Season  by N. K. Jemisin
- The Song of Achilles by Madeline Miller
- Orlando by Virginia Woolf
- The Left Hand of Darkness by Ursula K. Le Guin
- Parrotfish Ellen Wittlinger 

Don't forget to take a picture of your yummy food!!! We want to see your fab food creations!

- A Feast of Ice and Fire: The Official Game of Thrones Cookbook by Chelsea Monroe-Cassel and Sariann Lehrer
- Very Fond of Food: A Year in Recipes by Sophie Dahl
- Jamie at Home by Jamie Oliver
- The Redwall Cookbook by Brian Jacques
- The Oh She Glows Cookbook by Angela Liddon
- Leon: Baking & Puddings by Henry Dimbleby
- The Bob's Burgers Burger Book by Loren Bouchard
- My Drunk Kitchen by Hannah Hart
- Big Gay Ice Cream by  Bryan Petroff, Douglas Quint, and Anthony Bourdain
- Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient by Jennifer McLagan

We don't necessarily know how YOU grew up, so here are a whole bunch of different life stories. Surely one of them is dissimilar to your own!

 

- A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith
- Anne of Green Gables by  L. M. Montgomery
- The House on Mango Street by Sandra Cisneros
- Geek Love by Katherine Dunn
- Another Brooklyn by Jacqueline Woodson
- American Born Chinese by Gene Luen Yang
- The Adventures of Huck Finn by Mark Twain
- The Secret Garden by E. White
- Oranges Are Not the Only Fruit by Jeanette Winterson
- All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Here are some graphic novels that we LOVE!!!! Incidentally, we carry all of these and EVEN MORE in the store.

- Preacher Vol. 1: Gone to Texas by Garth Ennis
- Lucifer Vol. 1: Cold Heaven by Holly Black
- Fables Vol. 1: Legends in Exile by Bill Willingham, James Jean, and Alex Maleev 
- Sandman Vol. 1: Preludes and Nocturnes by Neil Gaiman, Sam Keith, and Mike Dringenberg
- Ghost in the Shell by Masamune Shirow
- Wonder Woman: War of the Gods by George Perez
- Black Panther: A Nation Under Our Feet by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Brian Stelfreeze
- Batman: The Killing Joke by Alan Moore
- 100 Bullets by Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso
- Spider-Gwen: Greater Power y Jason Latour and Robbie Rodriguez

Here is a list of books that cross a variety of genres. We don't know what you're usually into, but there's probably something on this list you never thought you'd try to read.

- The Screwtape Letters by C. S. Lewis
- Little, Big by John Crowley
- Good Poems by Garrison Keillor
- The Adventures of Tin Tin by Hergé 
- The Once and Future King by E. B. White
- A Murder is Announced by Agatha Christie
- Carry On, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse
- Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs by Chuck Klosterman
- I Am Not Your Negro by James Baldwin and Raoul Peck
- Twenty Poems of Love by Pablo Neruda

The definition of Minority: a group that is different racially, politically, etc, from a larger group of which it is a part.

- Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay
- The Color Purple by Alice Walker
- The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath
- The Wind-up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami
- Go Tell It on the Mountain by James Baldwin
- Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie
- Beloved by Toni Morrison                                                                                                                                                   -The book of Night Women by Marion James

We SAID anything from 2000 on, but we're not actually going to get that picky.

- Anything by Chuck Klosterman
- I am Malala by Malala Yousafzai
- Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer
-Bossypants by Tina Fey
- The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

You're sure to be able to pick a book that you've been meaning to read from the list of Pulitzer prize winners. Here are some of the ones we think are gems!

-  A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan
- The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt
- The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao by Junot Díaz
- The Road by Cormac McCarthy
- All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
- Swamplandia! by Karen Russell
- The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay by Michael Chabon
- Beloved by Toni Morrison
-Gravity's Rainbow by Thomas Pynchon

There are SO MANY CHOICES!!! Here are some that we highly recommend and probably have on our shelves!

- The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress by Robert A. Heinlein
- Dune by Frank Herbert
- Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie
- The Three-Body Problem by Liu Cixin
- The Man in the High Castle by Phillip K. Dick
- American Gods by Neil Gaiman
- The Yiddish Policemen's Union by Michael Chabon

 

1 Jul
2017

July 2017 Holidays and Birthdays

Welcome July! Oh how we've missed you, what with you fireworks scaring the shit out of our dogs and babies! We can forgive you though, July, because you also have a lot goin on, like National Ice Cream MonthInternational Kissing DayNational Hot Dog Day, and Walk on Stilts Day just to name a few. Read on to see what else we're getting set off about this month *baby you're a fiiiiiiiiiiiiireworkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk* Read more >>

28 Jun
2017

Happy 91st Birthday, Mel Brooks!

June 28 is Mel Brooks's birthday! Is it strange to write a blog well-wishing someone who doesn't know I exist? That I leave for the philosophers. Arguably the most esteemed comedic film director, Mel Brooks has made us all laugh. If I were to list my top 3 comedies of all time, two of Brooks's films would be featured (Young Frankenstein and The Producers, respectfully).  His films have influenced the way that my sense of humor has developed; what I think is remarkable about his writing and direction is the delivery and timing of his material. Here are a few scenes that I find work particularly well.

Young Frankenstein - 1974

An homage to the Frankenstein movies of old, this film takes a place in my heart as my favorite of his films. Dialogue from this movie is burned into my brain. I could go on and on about werewolves, Abby Normal, and quiet "dignity and grace," but there is one piece of dialogue in particular that always makes me laugh. It starts with Frau Blücher (horse noises).

     Frau Blücher: Would the doctor care for a... brandy before retiring?

     Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: No. Thank you.

     Frau Blücher: [suggestively] Some varm milk... perhaps?

     Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: No... thank you very much. No thanks.

     Frau Blücher: [suggestively] Ovaltine?

     Dr. Frederick Frankenstein: NOTHING! Thank you! I'm a little -- tired!

I truly do hate to explain the joke and ruin all sense of humor, I truly do. This set of dialogue often gets overlooked when people talk about the film's comedic genius, in favor of other memorable moments ("It could be raining," for example). However, these lines have a lot of meaning for me.

I would watch this movie a lot as a kid, and while I didn't get all the jokes 'til later in life, I got this one. Frau B being persistently nice and Gene Wilder being resistant to everything and suspicious set this scene up. The Ovaltine being completely out of place (and time), and Dr. Frankenstein's reaction knocked it out of the park.

I know I am biased, though. I remember on really tough days growing up, going to my room and being upset. My mother would come to the door and, doing her best Frau Blücher impression, would ask me these same questions. No matter how resistant I was (if I ended up laughing, I was no longer in my well-deserved bad mood), she would always make me break come to the Ovaltine part. By then I could talk about what was wrong. 

The Producers - 2005

While I do like Brooks's original film starring Gene Wilder a great deal, his later musical adaptation is superior (still bitter about never being able to see it live). The acting is wonderful in both, but the music in the film is just A+. What really sells it at the end of the day is the litany of well-written and fun songs. It is tough to find a favorite of all the songs on the soundtrack, but if I had to pick just one it would be "We Can Do It." Precluded by a step-by-step plan on how to pull of their scheme, the duet is perfectly executed by both Nathan Lane and Matthew Broderick. It's a beautiful song on how to be perfectly terrible. The parallel between historical figures of note and then themselves, sleazeballs trying to make a quick buck, is what truly makes the song work. It is so uplifting for such a scummy purpose.

Blazing Saddles - 1974

If you ever needed to know exactly who Mongo is, his purpose, how he acts, or whether he is the type of guy who can knock out an innocent horse in one punch, well, this scene covers these questions, and then some.

I have had a lot of conversations about Mel Brooks. Well, maybe not conversations as much as quote spamming and giggling. Everyone I have ever talked to has different favorite scenes, from conversations to film class critiques. That speaks volumes to Mel Brooks's ability as a writer and director. So many hilarious memories across so many different people, he has had quite the career (and is still making things!).

Happy birthday to an incredibly humble and talented man who has made an impact on so many people's lives.

23 Jun
2017

June 23rd, 2017! Take Your Dog To Work Day!

On March 4th, 2017, my wife and I went to Virginia, 5 hours from home (we drove there and back in a day, it was somewhat fun), and picked up the world's literal cutest creature.  Her name is Clover, she is an English Setter, and she is perfect.

Perfection.

She is also a pretty frequent visitor to Kards Unlimited. Thankfully, we don't need a special day for our dogs to come to work.  However!  Take Your Dog to Work Day is still pretty exciting, because dogs are the best and we love them a lot.

Omg her little face.

SO!  Here's what I propose.  On Friday, June 23, 2017 (Bring Your Dog to Work Day is always the Friday after Father's Day), take your dog to work!  Assuming your work is cool and not the worst, that is.  BUT!  After (or before or during or whatever) you do that, bring your dog to MY work so I can play with it.  I know, I know, your dog isn't as cute as Clover.  It's okay.  I mean, look at her.

Yeah, she's amazing.  It's cool.  I'm sure your dog is also cute.  Most dogs are.  So, anyway, bring your dogs to KU on Bring Your Dog to (My) Work Day, please and thank you!

Here are some more pictures of Clover!

This is very interesting grass, you guys.

We call it Resting Mope Face. She may look distraught in this picture, but it's really just her face. That's just how she looks.

Here's the opposite of Resting Mope Face.

 

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