30 Dec
2011

Life of Pi by Yann Martel

*Marlie’s Pick*

Mar­lie thinks this anony­mous review says it best:

It reads like the old fash­ioned sto­ry­telling- the kind which boys and girls sit cross-legged and rapt around an old man who, despite his calm demeanor and soft tones, fierce­ly com­mands the room’s atten­tion. In this case the sto­ry he tells is mys­te­ri­ous and won­drous. It is unlike any­thing any­one has ever heard. And so the children’s par­ents linger around the out­side of the cir­cle, not­ing the teller’s words and sens­ing that some­thing is per­co­lat­ing deep beneath the char­ac­ters and the action, some­thing that, with a know­ing glint and a rare hint, the sto­ry­teller sug­gests but doesn’t let on entire­ly, some moral or truth, or may­be some insight into the human con­di­tion.
And so a sto­ry- a tru­ly sen­sa­tion­al and dra­mat­ic sto­ry based on a boy trapped in a small lifeboat in the mid­dle of the Paci­fic Ocean for 277 days with a Ben­gal Tiger, an often- bloody strug­gle for life and death- arrives in a voice that is even mea­sured, paced, scaled. And this voice opens the doors for every­thing else that is packed in: the vivid aquat­ic sce­nes, the reflec­tions on reli­gion, human need and vice, the range and impor­tance of zoo­log­i­cal under­stand­ing.
Faced with all this, the boys and girls and moth­ers and fathers learn and won­der, and per­haps some of them become aware that this man is not just a sto­ry­teller, but tru­ly also a teacher, and that every­thing he describes- every quandary, every expla­na­tion, every detail, every rev­e­la­tion- every­thing serves to teach some­thing more than the sto­ry of a boy and a tiger… -Anony­mous

30 Dec
2011

Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card

*Jessi’s Pick!*

This book is my favorite book of all time. This was THE book that intro­duced me to sci-fi. It had alot to do with shap­ing the per­son that I am today. Ender’s Game deals with a our future Earth. Aliens had attacked many years ago and almost destroyed Earth. Luck­i­ly, they were defeat­ed and Earth thrived. Today, the Earth sends the best and bright­est of its chil­dren into out­er space to Bat­tle School, in order to become mil­i­tary com­man­ders for the alien inva­sion that every­one fears will one day come. And I’m talk­ing chil­dren chil­dren, like 5 to 8 years old. The book cen­ters around one such child, Andrew Wig­gin, known by his fam­i­ly as Ender. He’s the youngest to ever be recruit­ed and the book focus­es on his tri­als and tribu­la­tions.

In my hum­ble opin­ion, this is the best sci­ence fic­tion book ever. I guar­an­tee that fans of The Hunger Games will enjoy this book. Ender’s Game is sim­i­lar to Hunger Games (a future Earth, young kids doing things that even adults would shud­der at, adults mas­ter­mind­ing the whole thing, etc.) only it takes place in out­er space.

30 Dec
2011

Let the Right One In by John Ajvide Lindqvist

* Henry’s Pick*

Hi. My name is Hen­ry, and today in going to talk to you about a book called “let the right one in”. I am just bat­ty for vam­pires, and I have an unquench­able thirst for ANYTHING about them. The gen­re real­ly got some fangs when vam­pires moved away from Count “Ascot” Drac­u­la, and toward the des­per­ate ani­mal vam­pires that actu­al­ly scare the day­lights out of me. “Let the Right One in” takes this to heart (with a stake!). There’s noth­ing frilly about the vam­pires in this book, and at times they are down­right nau­se­at­ing. How­ev­er, at the crux of the sto­ry is the friend­ship of two chil­dren; one of them a boy strug­gling with divorce, bul­lies, and seri­als killers, and the oth­er a manip­u­la­tive child vam­pire who loves puz­zles. The nail in the coffin is that even with all the mur­der, acid-burned faces, creepy sex­u­al ten­den­cies, huff­ing, and flam­ing corpses, this book man­ages to be sweet and ten­der enough to burn to ash even the most vam­pire-y of hearts. there you go. best review ever.